Traditional Sunset, Eagle Crags, Utah Tuesday, May 17 2011 

I’ve been traveling with Tyler and John for four years now, for purposes of enhancing our friendship as well as our photography skills. And if there’s one thing that we bonded over more than over lens caps and ISO settings, it’s botched sunset shoots.

First, there was not one, but two sunsets in Monument Valley, a year apart, that left something to be desired. Then there was one when we didn’t get to Lake Powell in time on our way from The Wave, even though I hit 100 miles an hour to get there. There was one at Yosemite’s Tunnel View (although, the Sierras paid us back a few days later with a magnificent sunset from Sentinel Dome). And then the one when the skies finally cleared only when we were already many miles on our road out of the Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park…

If there’s one thing we can count on, that’s a less-than-perfect sunset.

Traditional Sunset

Eagle Crags, UT

And here we were, three hours before sunset, after a morning hike to Angels Landing, after driving up a bad dirt road, getting perilously off the hiking trail, setting up our tripods in between the bushes and trees, wondering if we will get rained on before the skies clear and allow some sunlight onto the peaks in front of us.

The peaks are called Eagle Crags, and they’re located just outside Zion National Park, near Rockville, UT. We saw them a few sunsets earlier, as they were the peaks getting the very last light, due to the fact that they’re outside the main canyon of the park, so the light lingers on them just a little longer. Tyler found a road on the map, and the road led us to a BLM hiking trail, which eventually goes all the way to the foot of the Eagle Crags hill.

Eagle Crags, UT

Velvia film shot, not as good as the digital

Skies were dark and foreboding, which made for a dramatic background. We were cheering for the sun to break through the cloud bank to the west and light up the red sandstone. We had reason to hope: it happened a little earlier, but it was not the magical “golden hour light”. I captured it on Fuji Velvia 50 film, shown here, and it looks nice, but it’s not quite the same as the main digital photo, taken just that much later. Light was changing fast, and I never snapped another film shot. I didn’t even time to change my lens – it was gone in a flash.

Still, we’ve seen some photos in the local galleries, and this formation, somewhat off the beaten path, offers great potential for some wonderful sunsets. On this evening, however, our tradition continued.

Advertisements

The Other Side of Half Dome Wednesday, Jun 30 2010 

I am told by mountaineers that the three most distinctive mountain shapes in the world are the Mustagh Tower in the Karakorams, the Matterhorn in the Alps and Half Dome in Yosemite National Park. – Ansel Adams

And, yet, this doesn’t look instantly recognizable as Half Dome. For the third love letter to Half Dome created by my 85mm f/1.8 USM lens, I picked this image, shot on Ilford FP4+ film using an orange filter to increase the contrast between the sky and the clouds. It is the back side of Half Dome, the side that makes it seem like there was a Full Dome once.

This was taken slightly above Nevada Fall, on the John Muir trail. Scott, John, Tyler and I have been climbing up Mist Trail all day and got thoroughly soaked three times – at Vernal Fall, Nevada Fall, and then again, a few yards from where this was taken, where some random snow melt endlessly dripped over the narrow trail as a never-ending cold shower.

We were tired and wet, but once we got to this side of the Nevada Fall, we realized what we were looking up at. The sheer, smooth cliff above was none other than our friend Half Dome, in a rarely seen angle. And while the fascination with its face and profile has been long documented in countless photos by masters and laymen alike, it was a surprise to see the smoothness of the dome, interrupted only by a few scars, carved by Father Time and Mother Nature.

Canon 7D, EF 17-40mm f/4L USM lens @ 40mm, CPL

As it were, I don’t have many shots from this vantage point. Day was getting long and legs weary. Some others have more interesting skies or a different composition; one of those, a digital effort, is shown here for purposes of comparison. But in the end, I chose this shot because I thought the sparse splashes of color distract from the beauty of the subject. A subject, that, quite accidentally, captured the heart of my favorite lens.

Cloud on Half Dome Monday, Jun 28 2010 

Half Dome is a great mountain with endless variations of lighting and sky situations and seasonal characteristics; the many images I have made reflect my varied creative responses to this remarkable granite monolith. – Ansel Adams

As I mentioned before, on our trip through Yosemite National Park, Scott, John, Tyler and I unwittingly made Half Dome the main subject of many of our photos. The peak towers over all of the Yosemite Valley, and you can see it from just about anywhere. Ironically, the only higher peak is called Clouds Rest.

This particular afternoon, we were stuck in the horrible traffic of the Valley, trying to get some supplies for the evening and the day ahead. We exerted ourselves on the Mist Trail (photos from which are coming very soon), and we hoped to take in the sunset at the Tunnel View. But, as we crossed the bridge over Merced river on the eastern end of the valley, we saw a big cloud covering the top of Half Dome in a striking scene.

Cloud on Half Dome

We quickly found a parking spot (no small feat!), and dragged our tired legs out of the car. The brightly lit Half Dome was reflecting in the river, but the late afternoon sun was leaving a lot of shadow and it was difficult to find the correct exposure. The only possible shot was with a telephoto lens, and I mounted my 85mm f/1.8 USM lens on the Canon 7D and fired off a few shots.

It wasn’t the golden hour yet, so the colors aren’t spectacular. I even thought about converting to black and white, which I’ve done below. But, I think just the sight of the threatening cloud obscuring the peak looks quite dramatic, and the pine tree silhouettes complete the framing very nicely.

Cloud on Half Dome, black and white version

Hiking Photography

Beautiful photos of hiking and other outdoor adventures.

Bucket List Publications

Indulge- Travel, Adventure, & New Experiences

Suad Bejtovic Photography etc.

Photography and more