St. Peter’s Basilica, Part Three Tuesday, Oct 9 2012 

I spent this Sunday afternoon finally developing a roll of Ilford FP5 Plus film. It’s a roll I started in Rome, and finished at the Italian Car Festival in Grapevine. I was a little hesitant, because the last time I tried to develop my own film, I wasn’t very successful.

This post might as well be titled “St. Peter’s Basilica, Part Two, Part Two”, because the photos featured here are just about the same as the ones I posted a few days ago.

St. Peter's Basilica, film

St. Peter’s Basilica, film

For the first photo, I climbed on a ledge of the obelisk in the center of the St. Peter’s Square, but I still had to crop off some tourists’ heads at the bottom of the frame, which made the photo a little wider than the natural 6×7 format of the Mamiya 7 camera.

St. Peter's Square, film

St. Peter’s Square, film

The photo from St. Peter’s cupola showcases that format very directly. The digital color shot in the previous post was taken with my zoom lens at 29mm, which is about normal for a small sensor digital camera. The lens I had on Mamiya 7 is also normal, 80mm, but because the format is more square, the field of view opens up to include a little bit of sky above the horizon, which was not visible in the earlier shot.

I very much enjoy the 6×7 format, because it is very nearly square, so there’s no visible advantage to rotating the camera to a portrait orientation. That way I eliminate one of the variables and I have one fewer thing to think about while shooting.

You’re welcome to share your experience and advice about developing film in the comments.

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St. Peter’s Basilica, Part Two Monday, Oct 1 2012 

The highlight of my visit to the Vatican was a discovery of a way to get up to the top of the dome of St. Peter’s Basilica. A barely visible sign pointed to a passage around the right side of the building. Seven euros later, you can get into an elevator that takes you to the roof of the basilica itself.

St. Peter's Basilica

St. Peter’s Basilica

That’s where the fun starts. I’m not sure if Michelangelo designed it that way, but the passageway to the top actually circles around the outside of the dome in a very narrow, rather steep stairway. It is definitely not recommended for anyone suffering from anxiety or claustrophobia.

The most interesting part of the trip up is the fact that the winding, circling stairway starts curving inwards as you get closer to the top, so you climb the last little while slanted.

View from the top

View from the top

But, then, a few steps later, you come out to the small observation deck and the view is nothing short of breathtaking. You pretty much see all of Rome from up there, and Piazza San Pietro is laid out perfectly in front of you.

I also snapped a few photos with my film camera, so look for those when I develop that roll.

St. Peter’s Basilica, Part One Sunday, Sep 30 2012 

A visit to Rome should definitely include Trevi, Coliseum, Forum, and various streets and squares, but it can never be complete without a visit to Vatican City and it’s central building – Saint Peter’s Basilica.

"I prayed for you, O, Peter"

“I prayed for you, O, Peter”

Today I wanted to show a few details from the inside of the Basilica, although it’s really difficult to focus on only a few details when you’re in the church. It’s a surprisingly large building, with a lot of nooks and crannies, several altars, numerous sculptures…

Michelangelo's Pieta

Michelangelo’s Pieta

When we’re talking about sculptures, it should be noted that St. Peters houses one of the most admired sculptures ever created – Michelangelo’s Pieta. It’s now behind bulletproof glass and visitors cannot get a lot closer to it, but there is a recast in Vatican museums, and I’ve even seen books of photographs showing every little detail.

Mosaic, St. Peter's Dome

Mosaic, St. Peter’s Dome

Final two details also have to do with Michelangelo, whose presence in Rome is felt at every corner, especially in Vatican. The mosaic of what seems to be a cherub’s face is one of several such faces on the inside of the St. Peter’s cupola, or dome, which was designed and built by the famous Florentine. The final photo in the post was taken from pretty much the same place, only looking straight up at the ceiling of the dome.

Dome of St. Peter's, inside

Dome of St. Peter’s, inside

The dome will take a prominent role again in the next post, when we explore the outside of the Basilica.

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