Yosemite Valley is a long, deep, narrow incision into the granite of the High Sierras, and as a result, most of its main features are visible from just about anywhere. I already provided some examples of that with El Capitan and Half Dome, but right up there with them on the list of the most recognizable images from Yosemite are the Yosemite Falls, the tallest year-round waterfall in North America.

Yosemite Falls and Pine

Yosemite Falls and Pine

There are a number of ways to photograph the falls, and we had some nice shots from various meadows in the valley, one of which appears below. On this day, however, Scott, John, Tyler and I decided to go up the Four Mile Trail, which snakes from the bottom of the valley all the way up to Glacier Point. The trail is one of the signature trails of the park, and it’s actually five miles long. The first part of the trail offers a great “reverse tunnel view”, where a somewhat distorted eastern profile of El Capitan is on your right, and the Cathedral Peaks on the left. But then, slowly, the trail keeps shifting eastward and there are many spectacular views of the Yosemite Falls.

What’s interesting about this is that the perspective is somewhat changed by the elevation gained on the trail. The plumes of water spray at the bottom of the Upper falls come into full view, and the Lower falls, which is somewhat secluded by the narrow gorge it carved, can be clearly seen.

This is the highest I got on the trail; I had my lunch here, looking at the falls on my right and El Capitan on my left. It is the first shot I took with my Pan F film in medium format (120), and it turned out that this film produced nothing but winners.

Yosemite Falls, from the meadow

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