It’s difficult to reduce El Capitan to a description. Photos may be worth a thousand words, but not even a thousand photos can prepare you for when you first see this behemoth. It’s not just a rock. It’s a vast vertical wall of granite, rising from the earth to the height equal to about two Empire State Buildings stacked on top of each other.

But it’s even more than just stats and numbers. The prominent protrusion, dubbed “The Nose” by the climbers, gives it a very distinct look, and a profile of a stern authority figure, with a furrowed brow and a menacing demeanor. You could almost see Ahab or Sitting Bull looking like that.

El Capitan, From Taft Point

El Capitan, From Taft Point

For the most part, you don’t even have to get out of your car to get a great shot of the giant. On our last full day in Yosemite, Scott, John, Tyler and I scrapped the sunrise shoot and slept in. John made killer omelets and we took off on the Glacier Point Road to a trailhead that leads to Taft Point in one direction and Sentinel Dome in the other. After some adventures on the poorly marked trail, we reached the scary outcrop of Taft Point, one of only a few spots in the Valley where you can look down on El Capitan.

Late morning clouds were moving fast, and the scattered sunshine actually created some interesting patterns on the massive mountain features. I clicked the shutter on my Mamiya 1000s just as a large cloud obscured the background of El Cap’s nose, but thankfully left the stone giant brilliantly lit. The Ilford Pan F film was stretched to both limits of its dynamic range, and I wish i can remember how I metered the scene, because I don’t think I could have done it better. This is easily one of my favorite shots from Yosemite.

Quick technical note: this shot may seem as a typical landscape panorama, but it was actually taken with a normal lens – 80mm on the 645 medium format. It may seem counter-intuitive, but my best shots around Yosemite were taken with normal or telephoto lenses.

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