Among the must-have shots in anticipation of the Yosemite trip with Scott, John, and Tyler, very high on my list was “sunrise at El Capitan”. The prominent brow of this massive granite cliff catches the morning light on its southeastern side, and we wanted to find a good spot from which to take in the great rock.

We did some beating around the bushes and wandering way off path (in some cases, all of 100 yards from the main valley road!), but the swollen Merced River wiped away a lot of the meadows and banks where a hopeful photographer would set down his tripod. In the end, we decided on a little outcrop in the river bend, just barely enough for four tripods. Then, we waited.

First Light on El Capitan

Unfortunately, it was close to the summer solstice, and the sun rose well to the north, so the only part that got that beautiful morning light was this very tip of the cliff. The triangle would extend down as the dawn went on, but the sun would just not shine fully on the face of El Cap until well into the morning. Morning at El Capitan Maybe some of the other guys managed to harness the extreme shadows and the bright highlights better than I did, but my best shot is this closeup of the top, taken with my 7D and the magnificent EF 85mm f/1.8 USM lens, looking almost straight up 3000 feet. As a bonus shot, here’s a wider angle image of the same scene, taken about an hour after the one above. Notice the much cooler, whiter light.

And while we ruminated that sun coverage along the cliff might be fuller later in the year (winter solstice? I shudder to think), simply standing by a fast-moving river and watching first light on the largest exposed piece of granite in the world was amazingly serene and thoroughly satisfying.

Advertisements